Friday, April 22, 2011

More about the Huguenot Crosses of South Carolina

The six Huguenot crosses in my state are identical (granite, same size) except for the two inscriptions. Each one has an inscription reading something like the following (brackets indicate elements that are absent or different on some crosses):

ERECTED A.D. [Year]
BY THE
HUGUENOT SOCIETY
OF SOUTH CAROLINA
[ON THIS GOD'S ACRE.]
Each cross also has another inscription that varies a bit more from cross to cross. I visited two of the six crosses earlier this month. The French Quarter, or Oranger Quarter St. Denis, cross was put in place in 1922. The Huguenot church here was built about 1687, or just two years after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, stripping the French Protestants still in France of any remaining religious liberty they had. You can see the first inscription followed by the text of the back inscription in these two photos (click to enlarge and read better):



The St. John's Berkeley cross was put in place in 1928, so its first inscription is identical except for the year and minus the phrase "on this God's Acre." A Huguenot church was built here right around 1700, the turn of the century, so just a little while after the French Quarter church. Here is a photo of the cross's second inscription:

1 comment:

  1. I thought that these crosses are granite.

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